IRT Jules Verne initiates project called ZEBRA



IRT Jules Verne has initiated a project called ZEBRA to develop 100 per cent recyclable composite wind turbine blades in cooperation with industrial partners. The project, launched for a period of 42 months with a budget of €18.5 million, aims to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental importance of thermoplastic wind turbine blades.

Wind energy, both onshore and offshore, plays a critical role in the world’s transition to carbon-free energy sources. With a product lifespan of 30 years and a wind turbine recyclability rate of 85 per cent to 90 per cent, the wind power industry is now looking to close the remaining gap by designing and manufacturing the first 100 per cent recyclable wind turbine blade.

The ZEBRA (Zero wastE Blade ReseArch) project has brought together industrial companies and technological centres – Arkema, Canoe, Engie, Suez, LM Wind Power, Owens Corning – to tackle the challenge.

The project is aimed at demonstrating the technical, economic and environmental relevance of thermoplastic wind turbine blades, with an eco-design approach to facilitate recycling. The project has been launched for a period of 42 months with a budget of €18.5 million.

To accelerate the wind power industry’s transition to a circular economy for wind turbine blades, the ZEBRA project has established a strategic consortium that represents the full value chain – from development of materials, to blade manufacturing, to wind turbine operation and decommissioning, and finally recycling of the decommissioned blade material.

IRT Jules Verneis a mutualised industrial research centre dedicated to advanced manufacturing technologies. Its vocation is to improve the competitiveness of strategic industrial sectors in France by creating disruptive technologies for manufacturing processes.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (SV)

IRT Jules Verne has initiated a project called ZEBRA to develop 100 per cent recyclable composite wind turbine blades in cooperation with industrial partners. The project, launched for a period of 42 months with a budget of €18.5 million, aims to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental importance of thermoplastic wind turbine blades.





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